Search Results: Byzantine Emperor

Search

Kojiki
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Kojiki

The Kojiki ('Record of Ancient Things') is the oldest book of Japanese history and the oldest text of any kind from Japan. Compiled in 712 CE by the court scholar Ono Yasumaro, the work begins with the gods and the creation of the world...
Albrecht Dürer
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Albrecht Dürer

Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528 CE) was a German Renaissance artist who is considered one of the greatest painters and engravers in history. A native of Nuremberg, Dürer was famous in his own lifetime at home and abroad for his oil paintings...
Roman Legionary
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Roman Legionary

The Roman legionary was a well-trained and disciplined foot soldier, fighting as part of a professional well-organized unit, the legion (Latin: legio), established by the Marian Reforms. While major tactical changes appeared during the final...
Nihon Shoki
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Nihon Shoki

The Nihon Shoki ('Chronicle of Japan' and also known as the Nihongi) is an official history of Japan which was written by a committee of court scholars in 720 CE. It is a compilation of myths and legends concerning the Shinto gods and episodes...
Legio X Fretensis
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Legio X Fretensis

Legio X Fretensis was a legion of the Roman army formed by either Julius Caesar or Augustus. The legion spent most of its existence in the East, primarily in Judea. It participated in Corbulo’s two Armenian campaigns as well as Vespasian...
Pausanias (Geographer)
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Pausanias (Geographer)

Pausanias was a Greek author, historian, and geographer of the 2nd century CE who journeyed extensively throughout Greece, chronicling these travels in his Periegesis Hellados or Description of Greece. His ten volumes of observations are...
Gaiseric
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Gaiseric

Gaiseric (r. 428-478 CE, also known as Genseric and Geiseric) was the greatest king of the Vandals who remained undefeated from the time he took the throne until his death. He was probably born in 389 CE near Lake Balaton (present day Hungary...
Ennin
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ennin

Ennin (c. 793-864 CE, posthumous title: Jikaku Daishi) was a Japanese Buddhist monk of the Tendai sect who studied Buddhism at length in China and brought back knowledge of esoteric rituals, sutras, and relics. On his return, he published...
Ninna-ji
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ninna-ji

Ninnia-ji is a Shingon Buddhist temple complex located in Kyoto, Japan. Known as the 'Temple of Heavenly Benevolence', it was founded in 888 CE by Emperor Uda (r. 887-897 CE). Ninna-ji is listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site and its...
Tiridates I of Armenia
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Tiridates I of Armenia

Tiridates I (Trdat I) ruled as the king of Armenia from 63 to either 75 or 88 CE). Considered the founder of the Arsacid dynasty proper, his reign got off to a rocky start with invasions from Rome and Parthia but, once crowned in a lavish...