Search Results: Bronze Age

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Cycladic Sculpture
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Cycladic Sculpture

The Cycladic islands of the Aegean were first inhabited by voyagers from Asia Minor around 3000 BCE and a certain prosperity was achieved thanks to the wealth of natural resources on the islands such as gold, silver, copper, obsidian and...
Minoan Pottery
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Minoan Pottery

The ever evolving pottery from the Minoan civilization of Bronze Age Crete (2000-1500 BCE) demonstrates, perhaps better than any other medium, not only the Minoan joy in animal, sea and plant life but also their delight in flowing, naturalistic...
Interview: Dragonfly Song by Wendy Orr
Interviewby Kelly Macquire

Interview: Dragonfly Song by Wendy Orr

In this interview, Ancient History Encyclopedia is talking to Wendy Orr about her first historical fiction novel set in the Aegean Bronze Age, Dragonfly Song. Kelly Macquire (AHE): Wendy, thank you for joining me! Do you want to start...
The Spice Trade & the Age of Exploration
Articleby Mark Cartwright

The Spice Trade & the Age of Exploration

One of the major motivating factors in the European Age of Exploration was the search for direct access to the highly lucrative Eastern spice trade. In the 15th century, spices came to Europe via the Middle East land and sea routes, and spices...
Hallstatt Culture
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Hallstatt Culture

The Hallstatt culture is named after the site of that name in Austria and it flourished in central Europe from the 8th to 6th century BCE. The full period of its presence extends from c. 1200 to c. 450 BCE - from the Late Bronze Age to the...
Legends of the Rollright Stones, Oxfordshire
Articleby Brian Haughton

Legends of the Rollright Stones, Oxfordshire

The Rollright Stones is the collective name for a group of enigmatic prehistoric monuments located next to an ancient ridgeway known as the Jurassic Way, on the border between the English counties of Oxfordshire and Warwickshire. The name...
Homo Heidelbergensis
Definitionby Emma Groeneveld

Homo Heidelbergensis

Homo heidelbergensis is an extinct species of human that is identified in both Africa and western Eurasia from roughly 700,000 years ago onwards until around 200,000 years ago – fitting snugly within the Middle Pleistocene. Named for...
Denisovan
Definitionby Emma Groeneveld

Denisovan

The Denisovans are an extinct group of fossil humans who, along with their sister group the Neanderthals, also share an ancestor with Homo sapiens. Thus far, they are known only from Denisova Cave in the Altai Mountains in Siberia, where...
Mycenaean Pottery
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Mycenaean Pottery

The pottery of the Mycenaean civilization (1550-1050 BCE), although heavily influenced by the earlier Minoans based on Crete, nevertheless, added new pottery shapes to the existing range and achieved its own distinctive decorative style which...
Altamira
Definitionby Lidia Pelayo Alonso

Altamira

Altamira is a Paleolithic cave located in Santillana del Mar (Cantabria region) in northern Spain, containing prehistoric paintings. The cave was inhabited for millennia and so, besides Paleolithic cave art, it contains remains of the daily...
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