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Speaker's Platform, Athens Assembly, Pynx, Athens
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Speaker's Platform, Athens Assembly, Pynx, Athens

The platform on the Pnyx hill where speakers stood to address the Athenian democratic assembly in the 5th century BCE. The space dedicated for the assembly could hold 6000 people.
Piraeus
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Piraeus

Piraeus (or Peiraieus) was the ancient port of Athens throughout the Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic periods and in fact consisted of three separate harbours - Kantharos, Zea, and Munichia. The first was the largest and used for commercial...
Themistocles
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Themistocles

Themistocles (c. 524 - c. 460 BCE) was an Athenian statesman and general (strategos) whose emphasis on naval power and military skills were instrumental during the Persian wars, victory in which ensured that Greece survived its greatest ever...
The Life of Diogenes of Sinope in Diogenes Laertius
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

The Life of Diogenes of Sinope in Diogenes Laertius

Diogenes of Sinope (c. 404-323 BCE) was a Greek Cynic philosopher best known for holding a lantern to the faces of the citizens of Athens claiming he was searching for an honest man. He was most likely a student of the philosopher Antisthenes...
Diogenes of Sinope
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Diogenes of Sinope

Diogenes of Sinope (l. c. 404-323 BCE) was a Greek Cynic philosopher best known for holding a lantern (or candle) to the faces of the citizens of Athens claiming he was searching for an honest man. He rejected the concept of "manners" as...
Battle of Chaeronea
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Battle of Chaeronea

The Battle of Chaeronea took place in 338 BCE on an early August morning outside the town of Chaeronea. Although for centuries the cities of Athens and Sparta dominated Greece, politically, militarily and economically, the Battle of Chaeronea...
Zeno of Citium
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Zeno of Citium

Zeno of Citium (l. c. 336 – 265 BCE) was the founder of the Stoic School of philosophy in Athens which taught that the Logos (Universal Reason) was the greatest good in life and living in accordance with reason was the purpose of human life...
Comparison of the Greek City-States: Athens vs Sparta
Videoby Ancient History Encyclopedia

Comparison of the Greek City-States: Athens vs Sparta

Athens vs Sparta! Learn all about the similarities and differences of the Greek City-States, Athens and Sparta! This short comparison with Kelly Macquire discusses the important differences between Athens and Sparta during the height of their...
Trade in Ancient Greece
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Trade in Ancient Greece

Trade was a fundamental aspect of the ancient Greek world and following territorial expansion, an increase in population movements, and innovations in transport, goods could be bought, sold, and exchanged in one part of the Mediterranean...
Love, Sex, & Marriage in Ancient Greece
Articleby Ollie Wells

Love, Sex, & Marriage in Ancient Greece

Love, sex, and marriage in ancient Greece are portrayed in Greek literature as distinct, yet closely intertwined, elements of life. For many upper-class men, marriages did not take place for love, and other relationships, be it with men or...