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Ancient Greece
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Ancient Greece

Greece is a country in southeastern Europe, known in Greek as Hellas or Ellada, and consisting of a mainland and an archipelago of islands. Ancient Greece is the birthplace of Western philosophy (Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle), literature...
The Library of Hadrian, Athens
Articleby Mark Cartwright

The Library of Hadrian, Athens

The Library of Hadrian (aka Hadrian's Library) in Athens was constructed circa 132-134 CE as part of Roman Emperor Hadrian's grand re-building plan for the city. The library was the largest in Athens and with its columned façade and...
The Pentecontaetia
Definitionby Christopher Planeaux

The Pentecontaetia

The Pentecontaetia (Pentekontætia, πεντηκονταετία) or “the account of the fifty years” is a term first used by Thucydides to describe, in Book 1, Sections...
The Life of Antisthenes of Athens in Diogenes Laertius
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

The Life of Antisthenes of Athens in Diogenes Laertius

Antisthenes (c. 445-365 BCE) was a Greek philosopher who founded the Cynic School of Athens. He was a follower of Socrates and appears in Plato's Phaedo as one of those present at Socrates' death. He is one of the primary interlocutors in...
Interview: American School of Classical Studies at Athens
Interviewby Sam Freeman

Interview: American School of Classical Studies at Athens

The American School of Classical Studies in Greece has been running its operations since the 19th century CE, with excavations across the country and an academic program that runs throughout the summer and fall. They are arguably the most...
The Desecration of the Statues of Hermes, 415 BCE
Articleby Philip Mathew

The Desecration of the Statues of Hermes, 415 BCE

On 7 June 415 BCE, various statues of the god Hermes were desecrated in Athens. The Peloponnesian War (431-404 BCE) had been raging for decades as one of the biggest civil wars in Ancient Greece, and the Athenians prepared for the expedition...
Pausanius' Guide To Ancient Athens
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Pausanius' Guide To Ancient Athens

Pausanius was a 2nd century CE writer who traveled extensively, taking notes on points of interest, and recorded his travels in `guide books' which could be used by tourists visiting the sites described. Born in Lydia, in Asia Minor (present...
Persian Wars
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Persian Wars

The Persian Wars refers to the conflict between Greece and Persia in the 5th century BCE which involved two invasions by the latter in 490 and 480 BCE. Several of the most famous and significant battles in history were fought during the...
Temple of Olympian Zeus, Athens
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Temple of Olympian Zeus, Athens

The Temple of Olympian Zeus in Athens, also known as the Olympieion, was built over several centuries starting in 174 BCE and only finally completed by Roman emperor Hadrian in 131 CE. Its unusually tall columns and ambitious layout made...
Parthenon
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Parthenon

The magnificent temple on the Acropolis of Athens, known as the Parthenon, was built between 447 and 432 BCE in the Age of Pericles, and it was dedicated to the city's patron deity Athena Parthenos. The temple was constructed to house the...