Search Results: Aqueduct

Search

Aqueduct
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Aqueduct

In antiquity, aqueducts transported water from one place to another, achieving a regular and controlled supply to a place that would not otherwise have received sufficient quantities. Consequently, aqueducts met basic needs such as the irrigation...
Roman Engineering
Definitionby Victor Labate

Roman Engineering

The Romans are known for their remarkable engineering feats, be they roads, bridges, tunnels, or their impressive aqueducts. Their constructions, many of them still standing, are a testament to their superior engineering skills and ingenuity...
Jerwan Aqueduct
Imageby Sebastian Meyer

Jerwan Aqueduct

These are the remains of the oldest known aqueduct in the world. The Jerwan Aqueduct was constructed by king Sennacherib I of Assyria between 703 and 690 BCE. It represents a great feat of Assyrian engineering. The aqueduct was transporting...
Roman Mills
Articleby Victor Labate

Roman Mills

The Romans constructed mills for use in agriculture, mining and construction. Around the 3rd century BCE, the first mills were used to grind grain. Later developments and breakthroughs in milling technology expanded their use to crushing...
Vitruvius
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Vitruvius

Marcus Vitruvius Pollio (c. 90 - c. 20 BCE), better known simply as Vitruvius, was a Roman military engineer and architect who wrote De Architectura (On Architecture), a treatise which combines the history of ancient architecture and engineering...
Roman Science
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Roman Science

The Romans assimilated earlier Greek science for their own purposes, evaluating and then accepting or rejecting that which was most useful, much as they did in other fields such as warfare, art, and theatre. This assimilation of Greek thought...
Roman Architecture
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Roman Architecture

Roman architecture continued the legacy left by Greek architects and the established architectural orders, especially the Corinthian. The Romans were also innovators and they combined new construction techniques and materials with creative...
Roman Tunnels
Articleby Victor Labate

Roman Tunnels

The first tunnels in the Mediterranean were built to transport water from distant springs and mountains to arid areas and cities. They also ensured the constant supply of water when cities were under siege. For example, the 533 m (583 yards...
The Roman Aqueduct of Pont du Gard
Imageby Michael Gwyther-Jones

The Roman Aqueduct of Pont du Gard

The Pont du Gard is an aqueduct in the South of France constructed by the Roman Empire, and located in Vers-Pont-du-Gard near Remoulins, in the Gard d├ępartement. It has long been thought that the Pont du Gard was built by Augustus' son-in-law...
Qanat
Definitionby Corey S. Vaughan

Qanat

The qanat (called foggara in North Africa and the Levant, falaj in the United Arab Emirates and Oman, kariz in Iran, and puquios in Peru) is an ancient Middle Eastern irrigation technique in which a long tunnel is dug into arid land that...
Membership