Search Results: Antipater (Macedonian General)

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Basilicas (General) - Ancient Rome Live (AIRC)
Videoby American Institute for Roman Culture

Basilicas (General) - Ancient Rome Live (AIRC)

The term comes from the Greek word “kingly hall” to describe the covered public hall or stoa that the Romans first built in the forum area in the 2nd Century BCE for conducting legal and business activities. The Basilica Porcia was first...
Michael IV the Paphlagonian
Definitionby Michael Goodyear

Michael IV the Paphlagonian

Michael IV the Paphlagonian was Byzantine emperor from 1034 to 1041 CE. He had an affair with Empress Zoe, then married her and was crowned emperor after the death of her first husband, Romanos III. He ran a competent regime that kept the...
Masada
Definitionby Rebecca Denova

Masada

Masada (“fortress” in Hebrew) is a mountain complex in Israel in the Judean desert that overlooks the Dead Sea. It is famous for the last stand of the Zealots (and Sicarii) in the Jewish Revolt against Rome (66-73 CE). Masada...
Hannibal
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Hannibal

Hannibal (also known as Hannibal Barca, l. 247-183 BCE) was a Carthaginian general during the Second Punic War between Carthage and Rome (218-202 BCE). He is considered one of the greatest generals of antiquity and his tactics are still studied...
Battle of the Granicus
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Battle of the Granicus

The Battle of the Granicus in May 334 BCE was Alexander the Great's (356-323 BCE) first major victory against the forces of the Achaemenid Empire. Alexander had crossed the Hellespont with his combined Macedonian and Greek forces and stepped...
Hypaspist
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Hypaspist

The hypaspists were a type of infantry soldier who served as a vital part of the Macedonian armies of both Philip II and his son and heir Alexander III, better known to most as Alexander the Great. They became an invaluable piece of an infantry...
Constantine VII
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Constantine VII

Constantine VII was Byzantine emperor from 945 until 959 CE. Sometimes known as Constantine Porphyrogennetos because of his birth in the purple chamber of the royal palace, he was served by various regents from 912 CE until reigning in his...
Hanging Gardens of Babylon
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Hanging Gardens of Babylon

The Hanging Gardens of Babylon were the fabled gardens which beautified the capital of the Neo-Babylonian Empire, built by its greatest king Nebuchadnezzar II (r. 605-562 BCE). One of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, they are the only...
Ishtar Gate
Definitionby Brittany Garcia

Ishtar Gate

The Ishtar Gate was constructed by the Babylonian King Nebuchadnezzar II circa 575 BCE. It was the eighth gate of the city of Babylon (in present-day Iraq) and was the main entrance into the city. The Ishtar Gate was part of Nebuchadnezzar's...
Statue of Zeus at Olympia
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Statue of Zeus at Olympia

The monumental statue of Zeus at Olympia in Greece was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Created in the 430s BCE under the supervision of the master Greek sculptor Phidias, the huge ivory and gold statue was bigger even than...
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