Search Results: Antipater (Macedonian General)

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Pausanias the Spartan
Imageby Mary Harrsch (Photographed at the Capitoline Museums, Rome)

Pausanias the Spartan

A portrait bust of Pausanias, the 5th century BCE Spartan general and regent who successfully commanded the Greek forces at the Battle of Plataea in 479 BCE. (Capitoline Museums, Rome)
Attalid Dynasty
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Attalid Dynasty

The Attalid Dynasty ruled an empire from their capital at Pergamon during the 3rd and 2nd century BCE. Fighting for their place in the turbulent world following the death of Alexander the Great, the Attalids briefly flourished with Pergamon...
Arsinoe II Philadelphus
Definitionby Branko van Oppen

Arsinoe II Philadelphus

Arsinoe II (l. c. 318/311 - c. 270/268 BCE), daughter of Ptolemy I became one of the most enduring figures of the Lagid or Ptolemaic Dynasty and left an undeniable mark in the historical evidence. She was married three times; first to Alexander...
The Celtic Invasion of Greece
Articleby Jeffrey King

The Celtic Invasion of Greece

Between the 5th and 4th centuries BCE, Celtic tribes moved en masse into southern Europe, intent on seizing land and wealth to feed their swelling numbers. As these tribes began crossing the Alps, they came into conflict with the Romans and...
Battles of Ancient Greece
Imageby Megistias

Battles of Ancient Greece

A map showing the locations of battles in ancient Greece.
Plataea 479 BCE
Imageby MinisterForBadTimes

Plataea 479 BCE

The initial positions of the Greek (blue/purple) and Persian (red) armies prior to the Battle of Plataea in August 479 BCE. The two armies were separated by the river Asopus. Also indicated are the Persian fortified camp, the town of Plataea...
Temple of Artemis at Ephesus
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Temple of Artemis at Ephesus

The Temple of Artemis at Ephesus was located on the western coast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey) and built in the 6th century BCE. Such was its tremendous size, double the dimensions of other Greek temples including the Parthenon, that it...
The Life and Thought of Zeno of Citium in Diogenes Laertius
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

The Life and Thought of Zeno of Citium in Diogenes Laertius

Zeno of Citium (c. 336 – 265 BCE) was the founder of the Stoic School of philosophy in Athens, which taught that the Logos (Universal Reason) was the greatest good in life and living in accordance with reason was the meaning of life...
Colossus of Rhodes
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Colossus of Rhodes

The Colossus of Rhodes was a gigantic 33-metre-high bronze statue of the sun god Helios which stood by the harbour of that city from c. 280 BCE. Rhodes was then one of the most important trading ports in the ancient Mediterranean and the...
Ten Noble and Notorious Women of Ancient Greece
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Ten Noble and Notorious Women of Ancient Greece

Women in ancient Greece, outside of Sparta, had almost no rights and no political or legal power. Even so, some women broke through the social and cultural restictions to make their mark on history. All of the women did so at great personal...