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Aedile
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Aedile

The aedile was an official of the Roman Republic who maintained Roman roads, supervised the grain and water supply, and provided the city's citizens with games among other duties. Initially, they were plebeian and elected annually by the...
Consul
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Consul

In 509 BCE with the exit of the last Etruscan king, Tarquin the Elder, the Roman people were presented with a unique opportunity, an opportunity that would eventually have an immense impact on the rest of Europe for centuries to come: the...
Tribune
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Tribune

Tribune was a title of various offices in ancient Rome, the two most important of which were the tribuni plebis and tribuni militum. The military tribunes were responsible for many administrative and logistics duties, and could lead a section...
Roman Law
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Roman Law

Roman laws covered all facets of daily life. They were concerned with crime and punishment, land and property ownership, commerce, the maritime and agricultural industries, citizenship, sexuality and prostitution, slavery and manumission...
Roman Government
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Roman Government

Western Civilization is forever indebted to the people of ancient Greece and Rome. Among the numerous contributions these societies made are in the fields of art, literature and philosophy; however, perhaps their greatest gift to future generations...
Quaestor
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Quaestor

Among the lowest ranking magistrates in both the early Republic and Roman Empire was the quaestor - “the man who asks questions.” Although the original position (quaestores parracidii) first appeared under the rule of the kings...
Censor
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Censor

A censor was one of two senior magistrates in the city of ancient Rome who supervised public morals, maintained the list of citizens and their tax obligations known as the census, and gave out lucrative public contracts and tax collecting...
Twelve Tables
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Twelve Tables

The Twelve Tables (aka Law of the Twelve Tables) was a set of laws inscribed on 12 bronze tablets created in ancient Rome in 451 and 450 BCE. They were the beginning of a new approach to laws which were now passed by government and written...
Patrician
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Patrician

The 4th century BCE Greek philosopher Aristotle once wrote in his essay Politics, “If liberty and equality…are chiefly to be found in democracy, they will be best attained when all persons alike share in the government to the...
Ancient Rome Government and Society
Lesson Packby Marion Wadowski

Ancient Rome Government and Society

We have prepared five lesson plans including classroom activities, assignments, homework, and keys to introduce government and social structure in Ancient Rome to your students. You will need minimal preparation to just roll with it in your...