Search Results: Greek Warfare

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Democritus
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Democritus

Democritus (l. c. 460 - c. 370 BCE) was a Greek philosopher and younger contemporary of Socrates, born in Abdera (though other sources cite Miletus) who, with his teacher Leucippus (l. 5th century BCE), was the first to propose an atomic...
Europa
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Europa

Europa is a figure from Greek mythology who later gave her name to the continent of Europe. In one popular version of her story Europa was a Phoenician princess who was abducted by Zeus and whisked off to Crete; King Minos, he of the labyrinth...
Pan Flute
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Pan Flute

The pan flute or panpipes (syrinx) was a musical wind instrument first used by the ancient Greeks. Most commonly played by shepherds, the earliest use was in the Cycladic islands in the third millennium BCE, and representations of the instrument...
Anaximenes
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Anaximenes

Anaximenes of Miletus (l. c. 546 BCE) was a younger contemporary of Anaximander and generally regarded as his student. Known as the Third Philosopher of the Milesian School after Thales (l. c. 585 BCE) and Anaximander (l. c. 610 - c. 546...
Epidaurus
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Epidaurus

Epidaurus was an ancient religious site and settlement located on the fertile Argolid plain of the east Peloponnese in Greece. Blessed with a mild climate and natural springs, the sanctuary of Asclepius at Epidaurus was an important sacred...
Ostracism
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ostracism

Ostracism was a political process used in 5th-century BCE Athens whereby those individuals considered too powerful or dangerous to the city were exiled for 10 years by popular vote. Some of the greatest names in Greek history fell victim...
Sistrum
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Sistrum

The sistrum (rattle) was a musical percussion instrument first used by the ancient Egyptians, commonly used in ancient Greek musical practices, and often depicted in visual arts such as sculpture and pottery. Made from clay, wood, or metal...
Stadium
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Stadium

In the ancient Greek world, the word stadium or stadion referred to a measurement of distance, a foot-race, and the place where the race was held and observed by spectators. The Great Games Greek sporting events were closely connected...
Plautus
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Plautus

Titus Maccius Plautus, better known simply as Plautus (actually a nickname meaning 'flatfoot'), was, between c. 205 and 184 BCE, a Roman writer of comedy plays, specifically the fabulae palliatae, which had a Greek-themed storyline. His plays...
Antigonus I
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Antigonus I

Antigonus I Monophthalmus ("the One-Eyed") (382 -301 BCE) was one of the successor kings to Alexander the Great, controlling Macedonia and Greece. When Alexander the Great died in 323 BCE, a conflict known as the Wars of the Diadochi ensued...