Search Results: Wars of the Diadochi

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Richard III of England
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Richard III of England

Richard III of England ruled as king from 1483 to 1485 CE. Richard succeeded Edward V of England (r. Apr-Jun 1483 CE), the son of Edward IV of England (r. 1461-1470 CE & 1471-1483 CE) in mysterious circumstances. The young Edward V and...
Battles of the Roman Republic
Collectionby Mark Cartwright

Battles of the Roman Republic

In this collection we look at some of the most significant battles that shaped the history of the Roman Republic. There were defeats such as at Allia River to the Celts in 390 BCE or at Cannae in 216 BCE when the Carthaginians led by Hannibal...
Sassanian Kings List & Commentary
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Sassanian Kings List & Commentary

The Sassanian Empire (224-651 CE) was the greatest expression of Persian culture in the ancient world. It was consciously modeled on the earlier Achaemenid Empire (c. 550-330 BCE) which established Persian supremacy in the region and developed...
Lycia
Definitionby Freya Burford

Lycia

Lycia is a mountainous region in south-west Anatolia (also known as Asia Minor, modern-day Turkey). The earliest references to Lycia can be traced through Hittite texts to sometime before 1200 BCE, where it is known as the Lukka Lands. The...
The Plantagenets
Collectionby Mark Cartwright

The Plantagenets

The Plantagenets, sometimes referred to as the Angevin-Plantagenets, were the ruling dynasty of England from 1154 to 1485 CE. The name Angevin derives from the family's ancestral lands in Anjou, France and the term Plantagenet (perhaps) from...
Diodorus Siculus
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Diodorus Siculus

Diodorus Siculus or Diodorus of Sicily (active 1st century BCE) was a Greek historian, known for his universal history Bibliotheca Historica. Originally, it was a 40-volume monumental work, covering the history of the Mediterranean region...
Sparta
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Sparta

Sparta was one of the most important city-states in ancient Greece and was famous for its military prowess. The professional and well-trained Spartan hoplites with their distinctive red cloaks and long hair were probably the best and most...
Ptolemaic Dynasty
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Ptolemaic Dynasty

The Ptolemaic dynasty controlled Egypt for almost three centuries (305 – 30 BCE), eventually falling to the Romans. Oddly, while they ruled Egypt, they never became Egyptian. Instead, they isolated themselves in the capital city of Alexandria...
Map of the Peloponnesian Wars (431-404 BCE)
Imageby Evonne Stella De Roza

Map of the Peloponnesian Wars (431-404 BCE)

This map shows Greece, Asia Minor and Sicily during the Peloponnesian Wars. The main powers of Athens, Sparta and their allies, as well as Achaemenid Persia and neutral states, are highlighted. Key battles are indicated by an X and military...
Between Alexander & Rome: The Hellenistic Period
Collectionby Patrick Goodman

Between Alexander & Rome: The Hellenistic Period

The Hellenistic Period refers to the time between the death of Alexander the Great (323 BCE) and the rise of the Roman Empire (32 BCE) in which Greek culture spread throughout the Mediterranean and Near East. Beginning with a series of conflicts...