Copper alloy foundation figurines with pegs representing Gods

Illustration

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
by
published on 31 March 2014
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Each peg has a very faint cuneiform inscription of Gudea, the ruler of the city-state of Lagash.
Foundation pegs were buried in the foundation of buildings to magically protect them and preserve the builder's name for posterity. In this case, the peg is supported by a god (Mesopotamian gods are usually depicted wearing horned headdresses).
Kingdom of Lagash, c. 2130 BCE. Possibly from Tello (ancient Girsu), Temple of Ningirsu, southern Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The British Museum, London)

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About the Author

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
Associate Professor of Neurology and lover of the Cradle of Civilization, Mesopotamia. I'm very interested in Mesopotamian history and always try to take photos of archaeological sites and artifacts in museums, both in Iraq and around the world.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Amin, O. S. M. (2014, March 31). Copper alloy foundation figurines with pegs representing Gods. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/2451/copper-alloy-foundation-figurines-with-pegs-repres/

Chicago Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Copper alloy foundation figurines with pegs representing Gods." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified March 31, 2014. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/2451/copper-alloy-foundation-figurines-with-pegs-repres/.

MLA Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Copper alloy foundation figurines with pegs representing Gods." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 31 Mar 2014. Web. 23 Oct 2021.